id card number generator where can i get a fake id in florida

2022-04-15

id card number generator where can i get a fake id in florida

Everything You Need to Know About Florida Fake ID Laws

  The fake ID may be a staple of teen comedy films, and it may be enjoyable to watch depictions of characters in high school or college trying to convince liquor store owners and nightclub bouncers that they are older than they appear. However, getting caught with a falsified driver’s license or identification card in real life is not as humorous as it is in the movies. This is a serious offense that may result in felony charges, and Florida citizens should take care to be aware of the real-life consequences ordained by state law for these unlawful acts. Here is everything you need to know about Florida fake ID laws.

  Florida Statute 322.212 bears this description at the top: “Unauthorized possession of, and other unlawful acts in relation to, driver license or identification card” (the statute defines “identification card” as any kind of card used “for the purpose of indicating a person’s true name and age”). While merely having a fake ID on you is a criminal act in itself, there are a variety of other acts related to fake IDs that constitute breaking the law.

  According to Statute 322.212, these acts include:

  Knowingly owning or displaying any kind of ID that does not belong to you, except if authorized by the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). That can mean a license or identification card that is “blank, forged, stolen, fictitious, counterfeit, or unlawfully issued.”Knowingly selling, manufacturing, or delivering a license or ID that is any kind of the above: “blank, forged, stolen, fictitious, counterfeit, or unlawfully issued.” Even offering to do any of those acts is illegal.For DMV employees specifically, issuing a license or ID to someone while knowing they have not met all the requirements.Giving a false name or any other kind of information when applying for a license or any other kind of official ID – this would be considered fraud. Also related is possessing ID with a false birthdate.For people designated as sexual predators or sexual offenders, possessing an ID that does not show the required markings as they are supposed to be displayed.Certain breaches of Florida fake ID laws have lower penalties than others. Committing fraud while applying for a license or ID card and possessing ID with a false birthdate are both considered second-degree misdemeanors. You may not only be punished with 60 days of prison and a fine of $500 but also be slapped with a year-long suspension of your driver’s license.

  As for all the rest, Statute 322.212 states that charges for breaking any of the other laws are felonies of the third degree. That means that if you are convicted of doing pretty much anything involving a license or ID card that either should not belong to you or has been altered from how it should look, you may have to spend up to five years in prison with $5,000 in fines.

  As you can see, all this is significantly tougher than just being barred from entering a club or buying alcohol. While fake ID incidents may make for comedy fodder in teen movies, the actual penalties under Florida law are anything but humorous.

   

  If you or a loved one face any charges related to Florida fake ID laws, you need to retain the services of a skillful criminal defense lawyer who can represent you in court. Anyone living in or near the Broward County area is welcome to contact the Law Offices of Michael A. Gottlieb, P.A. Our experienced attorneys will be aggressive in fighting for your case, and we will do everything we can to lower the severity of your charges or get them dismissed altogether. Call us today at <a href=https://broward-criminal-lawyer.com/everything-need-know-florida-fake-id-laws/”tel:9544621005”>(954) 462-1005</a> for a free consultation and more information.

Florida Laws

  The following information was adapted from the University of Central Florida’s “Florida Spring Break Survival Guide,” produced in the Spring of 2006, Funded by A&SF through Student Government.

  The Florida Legislature’s home page, Online Sunshine, has the full text of all Florida Statutes: leg.state.fl.us.

  City and County Ordinances are available through the Municipal Code Corporation: municode.com

  Florida prohibits open containers of alcoholic beverages in motor vehicles. Drivers receive a moving violation of $73.00 to $90.00. Passengers receive a non-moving violation of $43 to $60. (Fla. Stat. 316.1936)

  If the open container is in the physical control of a passenger, the passenger is cited. If the open container in not in the physical control of a passenger, the driver gets cited. An open container shall be considered to be in the possession of the operator of a vehicle if the container is not in the possession of the passenger and is not located in a locked glove compartment, locked truck or other locked non-passenger area of the vehicle.

  Many cities and counties regulate pubic consumption of alcohol by prohibiting consumption or possession of open containers of alcohol on streets, sidewalks, parking lots, or beaches. An open container is any bottle or can which has been opened, or any flask, cup, or glass that contains any amount of alcohol.

  If the police see you holding such an open container on any street, sidewalk, parking lot, or beach, you can be arrested for violation of the open container ordinance even if you are 21 years of age or older. If you are not 21 years of age or older, you can expect to be charged with the misdemeanor charge of possession of alcohol by a person under 21 years of age. If you have a fake id, you may receive still another charge. Under Florida’s revised fake I.D. statutes, many fake I.D. charges are felonies punishable by 5 years in prison and a $5,000 fine!

  In Florida, most open container violations and all first offense underage possession of alcohol are punishable by a maximum of 60 days in jail and a fine of $500.

  Many beaches prohibit open containers. Pay attention to signs. Cities and counties generally post signs at entrances to beaches and parks listing prohibited activities. By Florida law, alcohol is prohibited in most state parks. Please look for signs to avoid problems.

  You must be 21 years of age to purchase, consume, or possess alcohol. First offense underage possession of alcohol is a crime punishable by 60 days in jail and a fine of $500. A second conviction is punishable by up to 1 year in jail and $1000 in fines.

  If you are under 21 years of age with a blood or breath alcohol level of .02 or higher, your license will be suspended for 6 months. If you refuse to submit to the breath test, your license will be suspended for one year. If you weigh less than 240 pounds, one 12-ounce beer, 5 ounces of wine, or one ounce of liquor may put you over this limit. The suspension is for 6 months and is effective immediately but the notice you receive allows you to drive for 10 days after the stop. (Fla Stat. 322.2616)

  It is illegal to give, sell, or serve alcoholic beverages to anyone under age 21. The maximum penalty for violations is one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. A second conviction is a felony punishable by five years in prison and a $5,000 fine.

  Effective Oct. 1, 1997, Florida’s “fake I.D.” laws were amended to clarify that possession of any driver’s license or state identification card not produced lawfully by the appropriate governmental agency is a felony punishable by five years in prison and a $5,000 fine. (Fla Stat. 322.212)

  Lending your driver’s license or state identification card to a friend is a crime punishable by 60 days in jail and a $500 fine. Using someone else’s driver’s license or state identification card is a crime punishable by 60 days in jail and a $500 fine. Both parties may have their drivers’ licenses suspended for one year. (Fla Stat. 322.051, 322. 32, 322.27)

  Identifying yourself to a police officer with a fake I.D. is a violation of the laws cited above. It may also constitute resisting arrest or obstructing an officer. This is a violation of Florida Statute 843.02 and 901.36, which is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by one year in jail and a fine of $1,000. Signing another person’s name to a traffic ticket is a 3rd-degree felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and $5,000 fine. 

  If you give a police officer a false name or use fake identification upon being arrested or legally detained, you are guilty of a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by one year in jail and a fine of $1,000 for violating Florida’s new statute 901.36. If your unlawful use of someone else’s name or identification results in that person being adversely affected, you are guilty of a felony punishable by 5 years in prison and a fine of $5,000. You may also be ordered to make financial restitution to the person adversely affected. One point should be clear: if you are stopped by the police, it is a very bad idea to give the police officer a false name or false identification. While underage possession of alcohol is a crime, giving a police officer a false name or false identification is legally much more serious.

  Finally, carrying a fake I.D. in a wallet with a real I.D. can possibly lead to arrest for example if a police officer sees your “other” identification during a routine traffic stop, you may be arrested for possession of the fake I.D.

  It is illegal to sell, issue or offer in Florida any I.D. card or other document giving the age of someone without requiring proof of age. Penalties range up to five years in state prison or a $5,000 fine.

  The State of Florida is very tough on driving under the influence. Costs associated with a D.U.I. conviction can total up to $9,000 and include fines and court costs, DUI school, substance abuse screening, 50 hours of community service, and two 6-12 month driver’s license suspensions: one effective the day of the arrest; the other upon conviction. You can also expect your insurance to be canceled or the rates to skyrocket.

  Lawyer fees: $3,500

  Towing charges: $150

  Bail: $500

  Fine and court costs: $500

  DUI school: $215

  License reinstatement: $225

  Drug and alcohol evaluation: $100

  Alcohol treatment: $400

  Cost of supervision: $610

  Vehicle impound: $100

  Ignition interlock device: $600

  Loss of work: $300

  Three-year insurance surcharge: $1,800

  TOTAL: $9,000

  As stated in Florida Statute 316.193(1), you are guilty of driving under the influence and subject to mandatory minimum penalties stated above if you are driving or in actual physical control of a vehicle and:

  (a) You are under the influence of alcoholic beverages or chemical substances to the extent that “your normal faculties are impaired”

  OR

  (b) You have a blood-alcohol or breath-alcohol level of .08 or higher.

  If you take a blood or breath test and results are above .08, you will likely be convicted if the test results are admitted into evidence. If you refuse to take a blood or breath test, your driver’s license will be suspended for one year. If you previously refused (from a prior event), a second refusal is a crime.

  The arresting police officer will prepare a written report of your appearance, demeanor, and behavior, including the results of field sobriety tests. You may be convicted without a blood or breath test if this evidence convinces the jury that you were under the influence to the extent that your normal faculties were impaired.

  If you are obviously intoxicated, the refusal may simply increase the length of your suspension. The only airtight defense to DUI is simple:

  If you have anything to drink, don’t drive! 

  A conviction for a possession offense will result in a 2-year driver’s license revocation, even if an automobile was not involved in the offense. A plea of No Contest or Guilty to a possession offense will cause you to lose financial aid eligibility for at least one year.

  Federal Law

  Using and possessing marijuana is still illegal under federal law. The federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, and the Drug-Free Workplace Act require that UT, which receives federal funding, have policies that prohibit marijuana use, possession and distribution on campus and in the workplace.

  UT prohibits the use, possession and sale of marijuana — in any form — on all university property, including university-owned and leased buildings, housing and parking lots. Marijuana is also not permitted at university events or while conducting university business.

  Under federal law, it is illegal to possess, use, buy, sell or cultivate marijuana in all United States jurisdictions. The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 classifies marijuana as a Schedule I drug, meaning it has a high potential for abuse and has no acceptable medical use. No matter what a state’s marijuana law says, marijuana sale and possession is illegal under the Controlled Substances Act. Where federal and state law clash, federal law always trumps. 

  Florida Marijuana Statutes

  Drug laws can differ from state to state and that’s especially true for state marijuana laws. Keep in mind, your Florida driver’s license may be suspended for marijuana-related convictions unrelated to driving. 

  Driving under the influence of marijuana is illegal and has the same penalties as when a person drives under the influence of alcohol, prescription drugs or any other impairing substance.

  Florida Statute 316.193 Driving under the influence; penalties

  In 2016, voters passed a constitutional amendment, “Use of Marijuana for Debilitating Medical Conditions” ( Amendment 2). Amendment 2 legalized medical marijuana for individuals with specific debilitating diseases or comparable debilitating conditions as determined by a licensed state physician. Medical marijuana is legal in Florida, but it is still prohibited at the University of Tampa.

  The City of Tampa passed an ordinance in March 2016 that made simple possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana or possession of drug paraphernalia a civil citation. (TAMPA CODE SECTION 14-62). This only applies to the City of Tampa, not to other parts of Hillsborough County. The marijuana possession civil citation ordinance is enforced by TPD and does not apply to other law enforcement agencies such as HCSO, FHP and DABT. You are subject to arrest for possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana by these agencies even within the boundaries of the City of Tampa.

  Florida Statutes

  381.986 Medical Use of Marijuana 

  Drug Abuse Prevention and Control 

  893.13 prohibited acts; penalties.

  893.135 Trafficking; mandatory sentences; suspension or reduction of sentences; conspiracy to engage in trafficking 

  Flunitrazepam is a very powerful tranquilizer marketed overseas under the brand name Rohypnol. Possession of Flunitrazepam is a felony punishable by 5 years in prison and a fine of $5,000.

  Slipping a roofie into someone’s drink constitutes delivery of a controlled substance punishable by 15 years in prison and a fine of $10,000.

  Having sex with a person dosed without their consent constitutes sexual battery or rape punishable by 30 years in prison and a fine of $10,000.

  It is a second-degree misdemeanor (Max penalty 60 days in jail, $500 in fines) to inhale, possess with the intent to inhale, buy, sell, or transfer to inhale an amount of nitrous oxide less than 16 grams. Distribution, selling, purchasing, possessing, or transferring more than 16 grams of nitrous oxide is a felony of the third degree punishable by up to 5 years in prison and $5,000 fines.

  Federal penalties for marijuana trafficking

  Federal penalties for drug trafficking

  This information is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for legal advice from an attorney.

Possession of a fake ID in Florida

  Today many people are unaware of the fact that possessing a fake ID is a crime and it is a third-degree felony. Teens and young adults may be tempted to obtain fake driver’s licenses or other types of identification card(s) to purchase alcohol and to go into bars or clubs, even though, the possession of a fraudulent identification is a felony offense in Florida (See Florida Statutes §322.212). Possession of a fake ID charge can have a severe effect on your life, including having difficulties finding employment.

  If you have been charged with possession of a fake ID, it’s crucial to have experienced legal representation. The direct and collateral consequences of being charged with possession of a fake ID can impact your future prospects. A skilled and knowledgeable attorney can help you understand the penalties under the statutes and the possible defenses.

  Any person charged with possession of a fake ID in the Pensacola area should contact a practiced criminal defense attorney. John Terrezza of [firm] has years of experience practicing criminal law in the Florida area. He is effective and efficient in formulating defenses and an active member in the legal community.

  If you are facing charges for possession of a fake ID or for a related criminal offense, it’s important you exercise your right to remain silent and retain legal representation immediately. Contact the skilled attorney John Terrezza at [phone] or submit an online contact form for a consultation surrounding your case.

  Back to top

  Florida’s Fake ID Laws

  What are the penalties for possession of a fake ID in Florida?

  Related Criminal Offenses

  Additional Resources on Fake ID Laws in Florida

  Back to top

  In 1997, Florida’s fake ID laws were amended to make the possession of a state identification card(s) or a driver’s license that was not produced lawfully by the appropriate government agency an offense. If the only thing that was changed/altered was the date of birth, then the offense can be charged as a second-degree misdemeanor (See Fl. Stat. § 322.212(5)(b)). Additionally, a second-degree misdemeanor can be issued if the alleged individual lets another person borrow his or her driver’s license or state-issued identification card(s).

  Back to top

  When an individual is facing criminal charges with a fake ID, it is vital to consult a criminal defense attorney in the earliest stages of your case to have a favorable outcome. In some cases, a conviction is unavoidable and can lead to a criminal record. Below are the consequences for a criminal conviction of possession of a fake ID:

  The unlawful possession of a driver’s license or identification card(s) is a third-degree felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison, 5 years of probation and/or a $5,000 fine.

  If it’s your first offense you could face up to 1 year in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

  If the alleged offender lets another person borrow his or her driver’s license or state-issued ID, then it is punishable by 60 days in jail and/or a $500 fine.

  Your driver’s license could also be suspended for one year (See Fl. Stat. §322.051, §322.32, §322.27).

  Back to top

  Florida Statute §322.212(2) – The law makes it a crime to sell or give away a fake identification or driver’s license to another person.

  Florida Statute §322.212(5)(a) – “It is unlawful for any person to use a false or fictitious name in any application for a driver’s license or identification card or knowingly to make a false statement, knowingly conceal a material fact, or otherwise commit a fraud in any such application.” If you are charged with seeking to obtain a driver’s license or identification card(s) under a false name, then you can be facing a third-degree felony. A third-degree felony is punishable by up to 5 years in prison, 5 years of probation, and/or a $5,000 fine.

  Florida Statute §322.212(5)(b) – The law prohibits a person from possessing an identification card(s) or driver’s license with an altered date of birth. If the only thing altered was the date of birth, the offense is charged as a second-degree misdemeanor. A second-degree misdemeanor is punishable by up to 60 days in jail or 6 months of probation and a $500 fine.

  Florida Statute §322.32 – The unlawful use of a suspended driver’s license is a misdemeanor version of the crime and can be charged if a person possesses or allows someone to display or shows a driver’s license that has been suspended, canceled, revoked, or disqualified.

  Florida Statute §831.29 – Making or having instruments and materials to counterfeit driver’s licenses or identification cards is an offense. A person can be guilty of a second-degree felony and it is punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

  Florida Statute §901.36 – “It is unlawful for a person who has been arrested or lawfully detained by a law enforcement officer to give a false name, or otherwise falsely identify himself or herself in any way, to the law enforcement officer or any county jail personnel.” In other words, if you give a law enforcement officer a false name or use a fake ID upon arrest or when you are legally detained, then you can be charged with a first-degree misdemeanor.

  Back to top

  Florida’s Identity Theft & Driver’s License Fraud Protection – Follow the link to Florida’s Department of Highway Safety & Motor Vehicles (FLHSMV) to learn more information about driver’s license fraud, identity theft resources, and how to protect yourself against identity theft.

  Florida’s Statutes: Driver’s License – Visit the Florida Senate website to view the Florida Statute for unauthorized possession of, and other unlawful acts in relations to, driver’s license or identification card (322.212).

  Back to top

  Have you been charged with possession of a fake ID? It is in your best interest to seek legal counsel. John Terrezza of [firm] has worked in Florida criminal law for years. He is skillful and will use every possible resource to try to get the best possible result for your case. He will consult with you in every phase of your case, so you are fully informed and never left in the dark.

  Although the possession of a fake ID may seem like a harmless and minor offense, it is shocking to most people to learn that it is charged as a felony. Consequences for a conviction can lead to having to pay a hefty fine and serving time in prison. Regardless of your age, being charged with possession of a fake ID can have damaging consequences to your future. Contact John Terrezza at [firm] for an experienced criminal defense attorney.

  John Terrezza represents clients throughout Escambia County and Santa Rosa County including Pensacola, Navarre, Milton, and Gulf Breeze. Contact the skilled attorney John Terrezza at [phone] or submit an online contact form for a free consultation surrounding your case.

id card number generator where can i get a fake id in florida